August Health Month: Vaccinations


LIVE THE LIFE YOU DESERVE

According to the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases, an average of 50,000 adults die each year from illnesses that could have been prevented by vaccination. Certain vaccinations become highly recommended at age 65+, and there may be some vital vaccines you never received when you were younger. We're here to take a stand with you against unnecessary death or illness.

GOOD HEALTH IS WORTH A SHOT

Unfortunately, some diseases don't just affect you, they affect those around you - your loved ones, your friends and the people you work or interact with on a daily basis. That's why it's so important to get vaccinated to help protect you and the people you care about. The most common illnesses that are preventable with vaccines are:

  • Influenza (1 dose annually)
  • Pneumonia (For adults age 65 and over, one-time vaccination)
  • Shingles (For adults age 60 and over, one-time vaccination)
  • Whooping Cough (One-time vaccination)
  • Tetanus (After the initial tetanus series, booster shots are recommended every 10 years)

Talk to your doctor about the importance of getting vaccinated.

DON'T BECOME A STATISTIC

It is important that all seniors get vaccinated since your immune system weakens as you age, making you more susceptible to the flu and other diseases. In fact, ninety percent of all flu-related deaths and more than half of flu-related hospitalizations occur in people age 65 and older.

FACT OR FICTION:
IGNORE THE MYTHS

If you've been avoiding vaccinations due to what you've heard in the rumor mill, here are some myths you should be aware of:

  • Vaccines can infect me with the diseases they're trying to prevent.
  • We don't need to vaccinate because infection rates are already so low in the United States.

These statements are not true. If you have more questions or concerns about vaccinations, speak with your doctor to put your mind at ease.

HEALTHY HABITS TO LIVE BY

Vaccinations are by far the best way to prevent contracting diseases. But as an adult age 65+, you can adopt some simple habits to stay as healthy as possible.

  • Avoid close contact with sick people.
  • If you're sick, stay home and rest.
  • Cover your mouth and nose if you cough or sneeze.
  • Wash your hands thoroughly and often.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
  • Stay active and manage your stress.
  • Drink plenty of fluids and keep a healthy diet.

Ask your doctor which vaccines you should get.

VIEW ALL OF OUR HEALTH RESOURCES

FEATURED VIDEOS

Doctor's Office

Maximize the benefits of each doctor's office visit by being prepared. Before you go, make a list - of changes in your health and any questions you may have for your doctor.

VIEW ALL VIDEOS
Website Security Test